Could you be suffering from the most common of all autoimmune diseases?


If you're struggling with fatigue, weight gain, dry skin, thinning hair, sensitivity to cold, constipation, muscle aches, reduced exercise tolerance, brain fog or depression, you may be suffering from the most common of autoimmune conditions: Hashimoto's Thyroiditis, a form of hypothyroidism. Your thyroid gland regulates many aspects of your body's metabolic functions, from protein, carbohydrate and fat metabolism to heat production, oxygen consumption, in addition to stimulating bone growth by regulating your blood calcium levels. When your thyroid function decreases (hypothyroidism), symptoms appear that initially may not be traced back to thyroid issues.


Your thyroid function can be easily tested with a blood test. However, if your doctor does not run a complete thyroid panel, he or she may miss this condition. Some people may even have normal thyroid function tests and still have Hashimoto's Thyroiditis. That's why the functional medicine approach is so important to identifying the root cause of your symptoms.


Multiple factors can contribute to the development of Hashimoto's Thyroiditis which occurs when your immune system attacks your thyroid gland. Chief among these causes is chronic inflammation, especially inflammation in the gut due to food sensitivities/allergies or unhealthy gut bacteria. Other factors include:

  • Toxins such as the endocrine disruptors found in plastics (BPA & phthalates).

  • Chronic bacterial or viral infections.

  • Micronutrient deficiencies, including iron deficiency.

  • Chronic stress.

Addressing the root cause(s) of your Hashimoto's Thyroiditis will help you to recover energy, improve your mood, reach a healthy weight, and enjoy life again. If you think your symptoms may be related to hypothyroidism, it's important to ask your healthcare provider for a thorough work up. If you would like to know more about the functional medicine approach to Hashimoto's Thyroiditis, contact us for a free Discovery Call.


References


Calsolaro, V. et al. Thyroid Disrupting Chemicals. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 01 Dec 2017, 18(12).


Knezevic, J. et al. Thyroid-Gut-Axis: How Does the Microbiota Influence Thyroid Function? Nutrients. 2020 Jun; 12(6): 1769.


Physiology of the Thyroid Gland | Hashimoto's Disease (osu.edu).


Rayman, M. Multiple nutritional factors and thyroid disease, with particular reference to autoimmune thyroid disease. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, Volume 78, Issue 1, February 2019, pp. 34 - 44.


www.ifm.org/news-insights/balancing-thyroid-hormones-naturally/


The contents of this blog are intended for educational purposes only. The information presented here is not a substitute for proper medical attention, diagnosis, or treatment by a qualified healthcare professional. Always seek the advice of your healthcare provider before starting or making any changes to an existing treatment plan, exercise program or dietary regimen, and before using nutritional supplements.

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